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the saudis are providing virtually no assistance today to egypt. think of what is going on in jordan and egypt today. these two countries, each of whom borders the world's most resource-rich, energy-rich part of the world, today, are undergoing a rather draconian restrictions on the uses of energy. the lights are out in cairo every night at 10:00 and jordan has-rations. the live virtually right next door to saudi arabia. who are the three leaders who deserve special attention, mr. president? first, let's start with the prime minister of israel. if he gets another term as prime minister, he will be with you throughout your presidency. locked at the hip or perhaps another part of your anatomy. [laughter] your interests state to state our confidence and complementary. you don't have to love each other but you have to out -- but you have a big agenda with each other, that requires you to work together. it is very important for mr. netanyahu to work together with few. you are the great power and israel is the small power. you have a role to play in building a new relationship with him as
in terms of egypt, a place to live and, the authoritarian regina was especially effective for some time. this issue of outside support -- outside instability was a mechanism to sustain its role. there were many parts of society that are still susceptible to that kind of appeal, particularly in conditions of growing insecurity. i you addressed this as a matter of public education -- how you address this is a matter of public education. to diffuse the different view of these issues for public schools, and if there is the political will to do that, that is a different question. i thought you're getting to the different issue of human rights education in the security apparatus themselves, giving them a different perspective on their role. we have a double challenge here, and that raises the issue that we talked about, in terms of political will. you may want to elaborate on this point in terms of egypt. >> i would just add and say, the way you characterized the securitization of a lot of aspects of egyptian social like -- i will thank you for mentioning that. it is part institutional. it wa
egypt. my opinions in what was happening in the last two years is somewhat in comparison to what was happening in 1978 when i was there. what we are seeing now is that the u.s. has very little to do with what happened there. that the uprisings were very much from within and were very much about the economic devastation that many of the countries have experienced, and it was very much a grassroots movement. that means a signal of hope that this was something from the people themselves and not something imposed on them from outside. now i think we are a little impatient. it has only been two years. these countries have their own unique problems that we will talk about, but i think it has been two years. in the case of libya, it has been over four decades of stagnation. so expectations should be moderated based on the fact that this is a process >> let me just address this by answering the question, why were so many people surprised by the uprising and use that as an understanding of what is actually going on. we weren't actually surprised that the public -- this is something, every
of government and that our impression is that the presidency, the foreign ministry, the other agencies of egypt have worked together cohesively with in relation to hamas and to israel to try to bring about a ceasefire. so we have to support their efforts. >> dr. julian lewis. >> does the foreign secretary agree that the greater stride towards peace was when president sadat signed the treaty between egypt and israel, and does he, therefore, share my disappointment of the statement recently by president morrissey of -- morsi of egypt that the president situation is an act of aggression solely by the israelis? >> well,hile that statement is different from what he or i might say about the origins of this, nevertheless, i hope my honorable friend will bear in mind the answer i gave to the previous question about the very constructive role being played by egypt. my experience and the prime minister's experience in meeting president morsi is that he wants a peaceful future for his country, he has not turned against the peace treaty with israel. he knows the importance of now building up the economy an
in the relationship with egypt. this was a relationship that was not defined. they were worried about deterioration. this crisis enabled them to create a link where egypt now is part of a deal, one that is supposed to be an enforcer of a deal. stature hashis risen. host: have they had direct contact? guest: i am not aware of any because the president has avoided that. the israelis typically even in negotiations, day-to-day negotiations, the egyptians subcontractor these issues mostly to the intelligence services. hosni mubarak did that as well. it was not even a foreign ministry issued. i doubt there was any contact. if you look at what happened with hamas itself, when you look at the war itself, clearly, hamas paid a heavier price. israel's power is massive compared to hamas. hamas fired a lot of rocket, but if you look at the casualties, you have the five israelis dead and over 1000 injured total. what hamas wanted to call a balance of fear. civilians are terrified and they are sleeping in bunkers. israeli kids and families are also fearful. that did not translate obviously into an asset for them
, president mubarak, out of leadership in egypt, there was -- they were assisting in creating instability around our other ally israel, and that instability continues to grow. one of the things that was helpful from egypt while president mubarak was in charge, at least there was some effort to restrict the transfer of rockets into the gaza strip. so there were some tunnels that would be found, the tunnels had to be kept small so they were able to get smaller rockets into gaza. but now that there's a new regime, apparently the bigger rockets are getting in to gaza and they pose more and more of a threat as they continue to be fired into israel. the action is not only the fall of an ally, president mubarak, but the assistance in bringing to power in egypt the muslim brotherhood. they want to see israel gone and they would also not mind seing the united states gone. it's important when formulating foreign policy that the united states, particularly the obama administration, decide, are we going to be assisted with our own personal security issue here in the united states by the actions we ta
and the arabs going at it and egypt. but right before that iran saw its for turns decline. its popularity in the arab streets declined because of the arab spring, and then the syrian situation has introduced some very, very important elements, almost sectarian element that declined -- that eroded iranian influence in the region and the projection of the iranian power hit a brick wall with that. so all of this of course closed into the mix of what iran is thinking. and this is one of the reasons this is a good time to start negotiating with iran. as its reach in the middle east seems to be not what it used to be, are a superpower, nor is it a hard power superpower in the region because of the situation in lebanon and in syria. lebanon is really the coming disaster and syria is the disaster that we're dealing with right now. so of course all of this will go in and if i were american and while the american negotiators i would say, this is exactly the right time to go into this. the presidential elections are coming. but still as always -- we have to wait to see who he appoints as the point p
about egypt? could we see this president reached out to the president and talk about what is going on? >> the president, as you know, has broken no on numerous occasions with president -- has occasions mn numerous with numerousoris. -- with president morsi going forward. i do not have an agenda on what those conversations with look- alike. we have raised concerns. the state department put out a statement on this about the briefing. the state department have more information of this of a client how he has communicated those concerns. our interest is in the process, the transition to a democracy continuing in the development of a government that reflects the will of the egyptian people. we are working towards that. we believe it is in the interest of the american people and of the united states but also because it reflects the will and the interest of the egyptian people. >> democracy is in the process, but doesn't look like there is a transitioning to a dictatorship? >> important to take a step back. in november 2012, lookout -- look at how much has changed in that region of since late
is testing is real. israel is testing egypt. there is more uncertainty about israel and the end of -- the relationship with iran. what is hezbollah doing now that they are involved in their own fights inside syria? the opportunity for turkey to play a role right now. it just is the normans. this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i am reminded of bob dylan's favorite song. i propose we adopted as the anthem. there must be some way out of here. let's aim of for some relief, and maybe a little less confusion. i would like to propose the following format for the beginning of the panel. then i want to open it up for a lot of questions on the floor. i would like to propose our panelists talked about the situation right now, especially in syria. but what if scenarios, and their recommendation and context and perspective on greater security in the region and what steps might be taken in syria in particular. the people we have on the panel today have their year on the ground. y are constituencies there ar people whose opinions are sought. i would like to introduce a membe
type into the search engine the word egypt, and they got a totally different responses. why? because there is a process going on. every time we search for something on our laptop, we are not only gathering information. we are giving information about what we buy, about what we like, about what our political bias sees maybe -- biases may be, and you and i ought to get the same information if we tie in the same word. that is kind of scary. >> somebody is making up their mind about what we want. >> it is not somebody. it is a series of 0s and 1s. it is a computer algorithm. >> the algorithm is fine, and i understand it exists, and i will salute it. is there, but i want to know what that has to do with journalism. who gets up in the morning and covers some say -- something? who is going to cover a war? who is going to cover a campaign? without the journalists doing on is information gathering, all this stuff is below it. >> there are plenty of people who are going to do gathering, but the key word -- >> that is not true. there are fewer reporters covering the war in afghanistan then ther
saw this massive push in this really indigenous push within egypt, tunisia, and other democratic governments. some of those movements have had potentially scary things. there are some islamic fundamentalist parties that we do not have great relationships with and they understand that can be confusing thing. what obama has tried to do and in his famous speech in cairo is that he wants to deal with these countries and talk to the electorate. now we have an entirely different landscape, but in egypt, libya, and tunisia. relationship with these countries, these are countries with democratic governments. some of them have chosen paths that are a little more moderate, some leaning a little bit more to the fundamentalist side, but they're still fundamentally democratic and that will be a big challenge for the obama administration. host: its next for egypt? -- what is next for egypt? ?uest: in terms of ta host: the obama administration. guest: they still need to establish some of the legitimate government there. after the incredibly uplifting movements in it to rear square, it has devolv
years. you've had dramatic circumstances in egypt and libya and tunisia. they're working on syria. you could point to examples in borrow ran, for example, that's not moving as fast. part of the obama philosophy is very -- which is very interesting is trying to find what is possible in this area that does not get america caught in the trap of unnecessary war, repetition of quagmire. you have two examples of egypt and libya which are most striking. people on the streets clear my opposition to the dictator there. there are plenty of examples, for example, bush in tan man square. -- ton man square. -- tiananmen square. there's lots of examples where we tell folks -- bush sr. and iraq telling saddam if you want to crack down the shia, so be it . and because of that factor, that's one of the key factors that got them pushed out. libya was a different story where you have the possibility of a massacre occurring and obama said i would like to stop that from happening, very much so. but if i can't get a true blue international coalition through the u.n., then i might not do it. >> how about a t
in egypt was that the pyramid, the traditional model of power got i inverted. the people at the top got up ended and the base had its say. now the arab spring is ongoing. it's messy and dangerous and dangerously wrong in some geographies but what i am talking about is bigger than egypt or anything else. it's a massive shift and one of those moments that in 100 years the real historianses like the ones at georgetown write about its phenomenon in the history books. the base of the pyramid. the 99% is taking more criminal control. the institutions that! always governed our lives, church, state, main stream media and the music industry are getting tested and people are holding them to account, us to account, demanding that they be more open, more responsive, more effective, or else. here in the u.s., you have had the tea party hammering big government and had the -- do the same to jolly backers on wall street and social medias are competing and we have to hope the more enlightened ones are winning the day. social movements like the one campaign. 3.2 million people at last count. asking the wor
and israel exchanged rocket and shell fire. in november 13, is real and hamas said messages via egypt indicating interest in a truce, but then it degraded from there. at the question is whether egypt can play a role, or the united states which has sent hillary clinton, can play a role. the israelis debate a ground invasion of your reporting from gaza city, the olive orchards, they lied to enter the border. monday the area was a virtual no mans land. hundreds of families have fled. it says that gazana are not the only ones encouraged about a ground invasion. talks in cairo, continue in cairo. let us hear from on next call, terry in maryland, on our line for republicans. caller: america has no real influence in the middle east. i say that because we have been trying to negotiate this cents ronald reagan. and if we had any influence with the arab-speaking population, we basically would have succeeded by now. the reality is, for half of the countries, we are nothing more than ana tm, and the other half, -- we are nothing more nothingan atm and for the others we are nothing more than an an
today on my three-day visit to egypt, israel, the occupied palestinian territory, and jordan. since the situation in does that and israel escalated last week, i made it my priority to contribute to halt the violence with a priority aim of protecting civilians. i canceled a previously planned trip to travel to the middle east as a signal for the need for international diplomatic mobilization and prevent the further escalation that would put the region at risk. to strengthen the commendable efforts by egypt to reach a cease-fire. i want to welcome the cease- fire announcement. i commend the parties for stepping back from the brink and commend the president of egypt for his exceptional leadership. our focus now must be on ensuring that the ceasefire holds and all those needs in gaza, and there are many, that they receive the aid that they need. as i assure their relief for the people in gaza and israel and in the international community, that the violence is stopping. but we are all aware of the risk, and we are all aware that many details must be solidified for a broad, durable ceasef
irrelevant to what is happening. in my view, gaza will emerge as the seat -- it will be much freer than egypt. i think that is where things are trending. you could add at some point that the west bank may trend towards jordan. that may be the next step. we may wake. if the administration decides to intervene in a few years, it may be at a time when the entire dynamic of the conflict has shifted. i suspect the muslim brotherhood in egypt is not interested in a settlement where it would have to make concessions on jerusalem either. the outcome is now that is different from a truce. it would be ironic though, precisely around the time the u.s. finally came on board -- it is not that. is not that at all. the u.s. and all the western partners have come to that conclusion. >> you have been very patient. this will be the last. >> aaron, i am jim smith. i am the u.s. ambassador to saudi arabia. one of the trends we have seen the last couple of years is because of the ubiquity of information, it is fundamentally changing population's view of what they expect from their governments. it has created oppo
of old technology, to egypt -- to digital technology, they could share that with private users and everybody would be better off. that is what economists want to see. but as roger said, every time we get close, politics seems to enter the fray again. so i am hopeful, but certainly cannot guarantee the problem will be solved. >> i think we do have to be patient, though, because the remember the idea of the spectrum auction came around in the 1950's. it took us only 40 years to get there. >> roger noll is currently at stanford university, the record of stiffer institute for economic policy research. jerry hausman is an economics professor at the massachusetts institute of technology. we're talking about the 30th anniversary of the decision to break up at&t. gentlemen, and we will start with you professor hausman, what is the relationship between the 1982 decision by harold greene and is there a relationship between that and 1996 telecommunications act? >> yes, by 1996 it was well recognized that things had gotten out of hand. this technology had changed. a deal was made in large
was afraid to look at god. then the lord said, i have observed the misery of my people who are in egypt. i have heard their cries on account of their taskmasters. i know their sufferings. i have come to deliver them from the egyptians. and to bring them up out of that land, to a good and broad land. on land flowing with milk and honey. to the country of the canaanites, the hittites, the amorites, and the jebusites. the cry of the israelites has now come to me. i have also seen how the egyptians oppress them. so come, i will send you to pharaoh to bring my people, the israelites, out of egypt. but moses said to god, who am i that i should go to pharaoh and bring the israelites out of egypt? god said, i will be with you. and this will be the sign for you that it is i who sent you. when you have brought the people out of egypt, you shall worship god on this mountain. but moses said to god, if i come to the israelites and say to them, the god of your ancestors has sent me to you, they will ask me, what is his name? what shall i say to them? god said to moses, i am who i am. he said further, th
and 1967, the west bank was used by jordan and gaza was ruled by egypt. they created a palestinian state. instead, they sought israel's destruction and were joined by newly formed terrorist organizations. the truth is that camp david in 2000 and again in 2008, israel made far reaches for peace. they were met with rejection and even terrorism. in 2005, israel dismantled and entire communities and uprooted thousands of people from their homes. rather then use this opportunity to have a peaceful future, the palestinians and gaza -- thousands of rockets were fired into cities. areas have been turned into a launching pad for rockets into israel he cities and a haven for global terror and an ammunition dump for iranian weapons. they refuse to accept responsibility and make the tough decisions for peace. israel remains committed to peace. we need a peace that will endure, a peaceful that will secure the peace of israel. we have extended our hand for peace to president abbas. we want the palestinian state to recognize israel as a jewish state. that is right, two states for two people. in fact, p
for the opportunity to brief you today on my three- day visit to egypt, israel, the occupied palestinian territory, and jordan. since the situation in does that and israel escalated last week, i made it my priority to contribute to halt the violence with a priority aim of protecting civilians. i canceled a previously planned trip to travel to the middle east as a signal for the need for international diplomatic mobilization and prevent the further escalation that would put the region at risk. to strengthen the commendable efforts by egypt to reach a cease-fire. i want to welcome the cease- fire announcement. i commend the parties for stepping back from the brink and commend the president of egypt for his exceptional leadership. our focus now must be on ensuring that the ceasefire holds and all those needs in gaza, and there are many, that they receive the aid that they need. as i assure their relief for the as i assure their relief for the people in gaza and israel and in the international community, that the violence is stopping. but we are all aware of the risk, and we are all aware that many de
on this friday, november 23, 2012. we begin overseas. the cease-fire between hamas and israel has held. in egypt, president mohamed morsi showed his authority yesterday. a startling port grab, freeing himself from traditional oversight. president obama followed through on an annual tradition of calling 10 service members to personally thank them for their service. the washington times and the new york times reporting there are now more state capitols dominated by a single party that than at any time since 1952. the washington times question, is this the answer, secure for gridlock? we'll get your answers. send us a tweet or post your comments on facebook. also, you can e-mail us. we will begin with the front page of the washington times for our question for all new this morning, there headline -- do you think this could be a cure for gridlock? the new york times also has this headline this morning -- we want to hear from you this morning. let me give you the phone numbers again. how did you vote in the last election? did you vote with the intention of one-party rule in your state legislature? wh
billion going to egypt and the muslim brotherhood. i do not think that money ought to be sent because they proved they will be working with us against terrorism, by their trading with our good friend in the middle east, israel, and we need to be unified with israel, shoulder to shoulder with israel, preventing iran from getting nuclear weapon capability. one of the big missed opportunities of this president being quiet when they had the spring uprising and the resolution -- the revolution in iran. i remember ronald reagan said -- he called the soviet union the evil empire. we should have at least said those in iran who wanted a free and just society. the president kept quiet. i do agree with tim kaine on the issue of virginia tech. everyone should be commended by that response and all campuses are more say. i would like to ask you do you think we ought to be sending -- spending $450 billion? >> in my response, george talked more about sequestered. i want to do the same. we put two very clear visions on the table. we agree we have to stop defense cuts. we have two plans. i say we can a
. that's going to be a big challenge. host ks what's next for egypt? guest: in terms of? host: in terms of its leadership. egypt, the other nation that you mentioned. guest: i think the big push forward in egypt right now is to establish some of the legitimatecy of democratic governance there. it was a rocky transition, certainly. after the incredibly uplifting moments in the square. it's devolved into a long and protracted conflict between the military, the muzz lem brotherhood, some secular parties, and there still isn't a clear governmental structure there. for the egyptians, i think, internally, it is -- >> watch "washington journal" daily at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. we take you back live to the house as members return for two recorded votes. the bill h.r. 6156, to authorize the extension of nondiscriminatory treatment, normal trade relations treatment to products of the russian federation and require reports on the compliance of the russian federation with obligations as a member of the world trade organizations and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the h
interest. you take a look at egypt. under the original peace plan, we give tremendous amount of foreign aid to egypt. right now egypt is threatening israel. egypt is threatening the region because of the arabs spring. we have to rethink the dollars we're spending the egypt. we have to say these dollars are for maintaining a security and a piece. if you are not participating, you do not get them. we have to continue our commitment in foreign policy to israel. israel is our strongest ally. it is our sister country. we need to do everything we can to fulfil our commitment. the military aides we still is a real is that right here in america. when you look at the arab spring, there was a lot of hope that this would be continuing democracy, and we're falling into what has become not secular governments, but religious governments, and we need to be gathering up all of our allies and be making a firm statement that this region needs to be statement -- stabilized. we need to protect the people who serve and our state departments, not in all facets, whether ngo's the state department. it cannot procu
behind palestinianian civilians. but the government in egypt, which was backed by the administration, has condemned israel, not hamas. the terrorist group hamas doesn't want peace with israel. it wants war. it kills israeli citizens and then hides behinds the skirts of palestinian women. israel has the moral right and duty to defend itself from the bar barrack hamas. the united states should be in total support of israel, our ally. the u.s. should be bold in its condemnation of hamas and the u.s. should be bold in this continuing war by terrorist, like hamas, on civilized nations and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon rise? the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. blumenauer: thank you, madam speaker. perhaps one of the best parts of serving in congress is the access to our library, the library of congress, the dedicated staff at c.r.s., the magnificent reading room. the library of congress is a national treasure. and leading the library of congress is dr. james billington. he was a scholar and institutional leader be
rockets to the sudan, sent them up into egypt before smuggling them in tunnels. israel responded by doing the only thing a responsible nation could do, it defended itself. now the united states needs to show there are consequences for attacking this sovereign nation, consequences for hamas and iran as well. we should have stricter enforcement of sanctions against iran. iran and hamas both need to be held accountable for these attacks. israel are the moral right and legal duty to defend itself from the barbarians, hamas. there is a cease-fire but only until hamas obtains more iranian missiles. hamas is the puppet and iran is the police departmentetteeer. the iranian regime need to go. the iranian people need to do away with the little guy in the desert, ahmadinejad. and that's the way it is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the house will be in order. further requests for nute speeches? are there further requests for one-minute speeches? the gentleman from minnesota. the gentleman is recognized. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to recognize the more than
want in these foreign countries instead of letting the democracy happen what happened in egypt, libya, democratic elections. they're going to have to deal with their own almost civil war like we had to make sure that they get the government they want and not necessarily our outcome can't just be we can establish a government that's friendly to us. it has to be the people and sometimes it takes generations for these governments to really take hold and be by the people. host: thanks for the call. guest: that's a fair point. i wouldn't say that the problem in afghanistan is the united states is opposed to democracy per say. what i would say is that the united states and the rest of the international community and afgans themselves have a long way to go before they have something that looks like a credible and effective democracy takes root. and before we get there, there is the prospect that the country could revert back to if not civil war but extensive conflict throughout the country, extreme violence and that is of concern to the united states. and the reason it's of concern is not si
. what i am talking about is bigger than egypt. it is a massive shift that in 100 years, the historians will write about this phenomenon in the history books. the base of the pyramid, it is taking more control. the institutions that have always governed our lives -- st. are being bypassed and weekend and sears detested. people are holding them to account. they demand that day are more effective or else. in the u. s, we have the tea party and occupied do the same to the bankers of wall street. social movements are competing. we have to hope that the more enlightened will win the day. we have to help the more of my mental and the day. we are 3.2 million people at last count. we are asking the world to pay attention to the least among us. there are many things we can do to help them. we will see things are happening in the developing world. think about this particular moment. not just facebook in the heat of the square but the peaceful march across the world mobile phone. across the parched land of the dense rain forests of the congo. technology is transforming things. everything is speedi
it and the rest of us? one day we see the new government of egypt stepping up to mediate a cease-fire in gaza. the next it is raising concerns through new far-reaching constitutional decrease. we see territories slipping from the grip of the assad even as the opposition faces questions about it some coherence and the presence of extremists in its midst. libya has freely elected moderate leaders and has also come home to extremists and roving militias. iran continues to cling to its nuclear ambitions while its economy crumbles. just today, the palestinian authority, which has iseschewed the violent path of hamas and others, pursued a counterproductive path at the un. i will have more to say about that tomorrow night at the forum here in washington, but for today let me offer this one thought for u.s. strategy in the region going forward -- we cannot view any of these challenges in a vacuum. they are all connected. our strategy needs to account for the intersections and relationships. for example, you cannot understand what happens in gaza without tracking the path of the rockets from iran. or
with the of people of the arab spring. what happened in egypt was that the traditional model of power, the pyramids, but inverted. the people at the top got up and it and the base had its say. the arab spring is ongoing. it is messy. it is dangerous. what i'm talking about is bigger than egypt or anyplace else. it is a massive shift. it is one of those moments in 100 years the real historians like those at georgetown will write about this phenomenon. the base of the pyramid is taking more control. institutions that have always governed our lives, and music, are being bypassed answers the tested. people are holding them to account, demanding that they be more open, more responsive, more effective, or else. here in the u.s. to have the tea party hammering big governments. you had occupied due to the jolly bankers of wall street. social movements are competing. we have to help the more of my mental and the day. we are 3.2 million people at last count. we are asking the world to pay attention to the least among us. there are many things we can do to help them. we will see things are happening in the de
. >> we have a clash of technology in future. it is going to play out. she came across this egypt influenced network. if you google it, it is this blob of blue, red, purple circles. to the blue are people tweeted in english. the right people in arabic. the purple in both languages. having become one of the state department's more added twitterers. i had a fair number of followers. if you look at the map, i was off on the fringe. i was on the map but not in the middle of the conversation. that is the challenge. the technology does provide the opportunity to get in the middle of a conversation. they purposefully go en insert themselves into chat rooms to generate a debate and to try to change hearts and minds. there is an opportunity here. inside the state department there is as great ambivalence about the technology. there is this tension of message and time. i think their shores in what he should have done. was his message perfect? not necessarily. it was on ultimately embraced by the state department. he had the disadvantage of trying to do the right thing. that is the great dile
that have had profound effects. to explain how, let me take a detour to the arab spring. in egypt last year, when the government shut down the internet and shut down mobile service, many asked, how are they able to do that? what does it mean that they can do that? it is a very important question. let me focus on another important question that fewer people asked. how did egypt come to have an internet and a mobile service worth shutting down? the short answer lies in the most important policy accomplishment of the clinton administration that most people have never heard of. the world trade organization the agreement. monopolies 1990's, operated communication networks in most companies -- countries around world. generally, the government owns the monopolies. it was before the internet and mobile command occasions took off. it is not a coincidence that the end of that world coincided with the takeoff of mobile and internet. back in the 1990's, leaders at the white house and the state department, the commerce department, and the fcc, developed what many thought at the time was a crazy and cert
: we will leave it there. a couple of stories regarding the situation in egypt. the lead story in "the washington post" -- also regarding the same story in "the financial times" -- back to the phones with our discussion for remedies to speed up the voting process. cathy, you are on "the washington journal." del ahead. caller: we have a vote by mail here. it is wonderful. we do not have problems. i am a little bit surprised a many people in the eastern part of the united states think there is so much fraud. we really do not have that much of a problem here. we always have a paper ballot to recount. host: our next call comes from jane in philadelphia on the line for republicans. caller: the story a minority inspector at the polls. -- i am a minority inspector at the polls. i think the only way to fix the problem is with an id. i had a van pulled up and ask them to see if they were in the book. they were not. they handed me a voter registration card. it looked strange to me. it was stamped from the city of philadelphia. the address said south spruce street. i know it runs east to west. it
times) reports that some senators are threatening to end aid to egypt. mohammad morsy has broadened his powers less repair john mccain says that while the u.s. is thankful for his help facilitating the cease-fire between israel and the gaza strip, he criticized his decision, which has prompted days of violent street protests in egypt. another senator, max baucus, the chairman of the senate finance committee, says that he wants to preserve the estate tax break, which is important for farmers who want to pass down land to their children. he hopes to expand the production tax credit for wind energy. watch the senate live on c- span2. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> you listen to their member, who said the damage was unprecedented, that it may be the worst storm the city has ever faced, and that the tidal surge was 14. governor christie said the damage was unthinkable. we had fires, hurricane-force wind, massive flooding, deep snow. you look at that and the flooding into the subway systems, the shut-down of the stock exchanges, you get a sense of the massive scale
. tensions intensified in egypt as the muslim brotherhood president -- he has met with judicial leaders. that is the latest of egypt. and the los angeles times, syria is now a shell of its old self. the los angeles times reporting on that. and then this tension debate on whether susan rice should become the next secretary of state. this is the washington times. but as far back to our discussion this morning for all of you. going off the fiscal cliff, some democrats are saying that the possibility and wouldn't be so bad. steve, on our line for republicans, what do you think? caller: i totally agree with the caller from texas who said that we should return to the clinton era tax law. just think of that era we had. we had a budget surpluses. and we had a winning prosperity. i do not think we need to fear returning to the clinton tax law. and as the caller said from texas, the democrats have demonized the bush tax cuts. and so we will see with the demon is. the 47% who do not pay income tax from about 30% of them will return to the tax rolls. and at least the pain is like to be spread aroun
embassy over run, our ambassador killed. in egypt, the american flag brought down. in egypt, the persecution of coptic christians throughout egypt. in saudi arabia, we -- women are still treated as second-class citizens. in iran, roadside bombs against american troops. in venezuela, calling for that is correct -- destruction for our way of life. we can do that or we can depend on counties, ohio, the list goes on and on. let me leave you with this commitment. there is going to be a day when i go to washington and someone who is a powerful person puts his hand on my shoulder and says you had better vote for this legislation or i'm going to kick you off your committee or somebody said you had better vote for this or i will shut off or fund-raising or a journalist said its u.s. better vote for this or i will write a bad editorial about you. my commitment to all of you is i will look at journalist, that lobbyists, that political boss in the eye and tell them i do not work for them. my boss is the people the state of ohio and no one in washington is going to push me around. thank
intensifies and sent tanks for a possible invader. a story from early this morning notes that egypt opens a tiny window of truce in the gaza confrontation. the prime minister arrived in gaza strip on friday officially to show solidarity with the palestinian people after two days of relentless attacks by israeli war planes determined to end the militant rocket fire at israel. israel said it would cease-fire during the visit if hamas did too, but rockets fired from gaza hit several sites in israel and they responded with an attack on the house of hamas's -- that's it for this first segment of the "washington journal." up next, we'll have senator ron johnson, a republican of wisconsin, a member of both the budget and appropriation committees to join us to give his view on the fiscal cliff. and later, congressman keith ellison, a democratic from minnesota, will continue our discussion on the fiscal cliff. we'll be right back. >> truman was vice president for literally 82 days. and being truman, he actually presided over the senate. these days the vice president doesn't bother with that unless
their respective laptops, their computers, and they simply typed into the search engine the word "egypt" and they got totally different responses. why? because there is a process going on. every time we search for something on our laptop, we are not only gathering information, we are giving information about what we buy, about what we like, about what we find interesting, about perhaps what our political biases may be so that in theory a search engine that ought to be giving me objective information -- and you and i ought to get the same information if we type in the same word. not so anymore. that's kinda scary. >> because somebody is making up his or her mind as to what it is that we want. >> it's not somebody. it is a series of o's and 1's. it is a series of -- it is the computer -- what is the word i'm looking for algorithm, thank you. >> the algorithm is find and i understand that it exists and i respect it and i will salute it. it's there. but i want to know what all of that has to do with journalism. who gets up in the morning and covers something? who's going to go out and cover
on the ground in places like libya and egypt. you think this will reflect well on the u.s., or look like we are entering conflict for our own and game? guest: i don't think we choose to enter conflicts. we stuck with mubarak for while. we went with the protests as soon as they began on the streets. president obama trying not to become embroiled in to torsions abroad where he does not have to, but when things get too -- in situations abroad where he does not have to, but when things get to bad, he will. host: a comment on twitter. talking about ben ghazi and libya. what do those debts to reveal about president obama's foreign policy leadership? guest: that is a tough situation. i have been more following the campaign than the twists and turns of what happened in libya. it has not gotten a lot of coverage in some of the media. fox news have been pounding on it hard. i think maybe we will get some cooler answers after the election. host: jacksonville, fla., independent caller, patricia. caller: i am so sorry. i have three points i want to make and i were you to be patient with me. the first is
of letting the democracy happen what happened in egypt, libya, democratic elections. they're going to have to deal with their own almost civil war like we had to make sure that they get the government they want and not necessarily our outcome can't just be we can establish a government that's friendly to us. it has to be the people and sometimes it takes generations for these governments to really take hold and be by the people. host: thanks for the call. guest: that's a fair point. i wouldn't say that the problem in afghanistan is the united states is opposed to democracy per say. what i would say is that the united states and the rest of the international community and after gans themselves have a long way to go before they have something that looks like a credible and effective democracy takes root. and before we get there there is the prospect that the country could revert back to if not civil war but extensive conflict throughout the country, extreme violence and that is of concern to the united states. and the reason it's of concern is not simply a humanitarian one or to put who we w
. it is a neighbor that is important to us. at the same time, we were giving 25% of -- to egypt, afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we need to help our friends to the south. we put in 1.4, i think with additional money, $1.9 billion. for every $1 that we help mexico, they spend $13. there has been a lot of money on security. we have to understand what they are doing. plan merida where we started off. we did the easy thing. buying helicopters. buying this. i worked with the ambassador. i worked with george bush. i felt stronger about helping mexico. nevertheless, we work together. we did the easy thing with mexico with helicopters and airplanes. the hard thing is we need to start training are building their capacity of prison systems, the judiciary, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federal level. they're trained about 36,000 police. i think they need to have 150,000 men or more than that. we need to go into judges and train them to be prosecutors. did you know that a prosecutor here in the united states, and -- if he or she wants to get you, they have a 95% chance to g
their laptops, and they simply type into the search engine the word egypt, and they got a totally different responses. why? because there is a process going on. every time we search for something on our laptop, we are not only gathering information. we are giving information about what we buy, about what we like, about what our political bias sees maybe -- biases may be, and you and i ought to get the same information if we tie in the same word. that is kind of scary. >> somebody is making up their mind about what we want. >> it is not somebody. it is a series of 0s and 1s. it is a computer algorithm. >> the algorithm is fine, and i understand it exists, and i will salute it. is there, but i want to know what that has to do with journalism. who gets up in the morning and covers some say -- something? who is going to cover a war? who is going to cover a campaign? without the journalists doing on is information gathering, all this stuff is below it. >> there are plenty of people who are going to do gathering, but the key word -- >> that is not true. there are fewer reporters covering the war
to me sierra -- tunisia, to yemen, to egypt. host: this is from maverick, who says republicans would prefer john kerry, freeing up space for scott brown. susan rice has degrees from stanford and oxford. patty, republican caller. caller: i wonder if this gentleman is aware that cnn had no problem going into this embassy to find documents. it was deliberate that did not send in the fbi to investigate. this was right before an election, and this gentleman is not sure why it took so long? also, c-span should have done some in depth shows before the election. i am disappointed in how you protected president obama in comparison to the-shows when president bush was president. part of the problem in ameritech is -- in america is the media should put under their caption white house stenographer. there was also a laser with where the attacks were, and that is why he got killed. he was an absolute hero. guest: there is concern with talking points in the mainstream media, as it is called, but in my defense i have written very critical things about barack obama and his presidency over the last th
with israel and our partner, egypt, to and smuggling of arms into gaza while ensuring the safe passage of humanitarian aid. no nation should have to live in fear of these kinds of attacks. that is why i'm proud that our two countries operated so closely. the iron dome performed remarkably well during the recent escalation. it intercepted more than 400 rockets bound for israeli population centers for roughly 85% success rate overall. i had the opportunity to see the life-saving capability firsthand in august. we traveled to southern israel and visited the iron dome battery in that vicinity. it success is the testament to the ingenuity of the israeli people and the commitment of the united states to israel security. i assured the minister that our strong commitment to iron dome will continue in the future. ,t the president's direction the department continues to work closely with israel's minister of defense to ensure that we are making the necessary investments in iron dome. this spring we have announced that we would provide $70 million in fiscal 2012 and top of the 205 million previou
on c-span3, the u.s. institute of peace on the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia, and libya. this presidential campaign is being counted by the hours. we will show you both of the campaign rallies tonight here on c-span. tomorrow at this time the polls will be closing in the east and it will be determined whether the president has another four-year lease on the white house or whether mitt romney begin it is transition. the numbers tell the story from the polls this election is a dead heat. turn out will determine who wins and the fight for the battleground states continues. later tonight we'll have live coverage of the candidates in iowa and new hampshire. we did learn from the romney campaign two stops have been scheduled for tomorrow one in ohio. the president will p spend the night in chicago in his own home. he has no appearance ps for tomorrow before he travels for a victory or concession speech. we will have that as all of our coverage tomorrow. first from the campaigns some new web videos released earlier in the day. >> the romney campaign has put up an ad
. tommy more about what you mean. caller: in recent conflicts such as those in egypt and libya we saw the president rather than simply propping up leaders the u.s. formally agreed with cover to go along with the protest movement on the ground. the you think this help the u.s. image or the best to look on this as for their entry complex for our own game? the way i saw things is we stuck with mubarak for awhile. i think this is president obama trying not to become embroiled in situations abroad where he debts that have to, but when things get to a point where you have to insert -- assert himself, he will. host: right wing on twitter as if obama has apologized for leaving our ambassador and guards to die? what has the incident there, the death of those american citizens revealed about president obama's foreign-policy leadership? guest: that is a really tough situation. i have been worth all we the campaign than the twists and turns of what has been happening. that has not gotten a lot of coverage in some of the media. fox news has been pounding on that hard. i think what we're seeing --
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